Sangstories - Stories of Scottish Songs

Tales of Scottish traditional and newer songs sung by Sangschule of Linlithgow

Aiblins, Maggie

by Glenn Muir
Tune by Paul Streater

Simmer's gane noo, and autumn's fading
Rid leaves still cling to each fruited bough
And you'll fly south like the very swallow,
Alas, that you must leave us now

Ae last sang shall we sing thegither,
Ae glass o' wine drained tae the lees
In freenship's name the parting glass,
Be your journey safe and your heart at ease

But you'll live in my secret garden,
Where old friends meet, but never part,
There's flooers here o' every colour,
In this, the Eden of my heart 

Aiblins, Maggie, wi guid fortune,
One day we'll surely meet again,
And think on nichts we sang sae sweetly,
A harmony, or soft refrain

Ae last sang shall we sing thegither,
Ae glass o' wine drained tae the lees
In freenship's name the parting glass,
Be your journey safe and your heart at ease

In freenship's name the parting glass,
Be your journey safe and your heart at ease

Words:
Aiblins:
perhaps

This was written for long-term Sangchule member, Treasurer and friend, Margaret Moore, who returned to England to be near family after the death of her husband John. She introduced herself at Sangschule as “Margaret”, but we later learned that everyone else she knew called her “Maggie”. She had a lovely low singing voice, much missed for harmonies.

Margaret did manage to come back for two holidays and sang with Sangschule again each time but in 2010 she died after a short illness.

The “parting glass” song is a traditional form of farewell, accompanied by a glass of something to cheer the heart.